Current research

UK Human Tissue Bank Research Programme

Seema Chavda recently prepared a poster summarising preliminary studies using different preservation solutions to preserve freshly isolated human hepatocytes. For further details please have a look at the poster below which Seema has prepared. For further information email the scientific team science@ukhtb.org

Preservation Solution Poster April 2004

Our scientific team is focussing research efforts in the areas of improved cell culture techniques, induction and characterisation of P450 iso-enzymes and cryopreservation of human cells. This work has been made possible by the generous donation of a new HPLC system by the Lord Dowding Fund for Humane Research.

Our ongoing research collaboration with surgical colleagues at Leicester General Hospital continues to produce valuable information on our common interest in hepatocytes. There is considerable clinical interest in cell preparations, both for transplantation and for bioartificial livers to act as bridging devices whilst a resected or acutely diseased liver regenerates. Meanwhile, the use of hepatocytes for in vitro drug development studies and other research applications expands, as the use of the in vitro human tissue model becomes more widely accepted. As part of the collaboration, the UK Human Tissue Bank provides sponsorship annually for a surgical registrar working in a field of common interest. Tom Lloyd held this post for the past year and has produced a number of publications with colleagues here at the tissue bank and in the clinical community. This is now being undertaken by Clare Pattenden.

We are also involved in an inter-laboratory pre-validation study on the response of cultured human hepatocytes to model cytochrome P450 inducers. This is an ECVAM (European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods) funded project. This work is being carried out in collaboration between the UK, France and the USA. UKHTB research scientist Rakhee Patel outlines the project, which involves her working in one of our collaborator's laboratories in France.

Some of our recent Research Publications are summarised here.